Cost of Living in Australia

Cost of Living in Australia

 

The cost of living obviously varies massively depending on your lifestyle, so let’s just take a look at some averages, so you can see that as a skilled migrant, life in Aus will be very comfortable.

A family with 2 kids, 2 cars and a pet or 2 will serve as a decent example, living in a 4 bed, 2/3 bath house not too far from a city centre. (value roughly AU$ 500,000)

The most important point here is that you could save a lot or spend a lot more than this, depending on how well you control yourself!

Running Costs for the Home:

  • Mortgage = $23,000
  • Council Rates = $1400
  • Water, Electricity, Gas total costs = $2750
  • Building Insurance ($325,000 cover) = $550
  • Contents Insurance ($89,000 cover) = $360
  • Phone, Internet, TV = $1000

Approx A$ 29,000 a year = A$ 560 a week

Hobbies, sports and free time

  • Family membership of the local tennis club = $300 per year
  • Golf (6 day membership of private club) = $1300 per year
  • Swimming/yoga/gym (1 session) = $10 per week
  • Cub Scouts = $250 per year
  • Winter kids sports (Soccer & Netball) = $200 per year
  • Summer kids sports (Teeball & Surf Club) = $200 per year

The total cost of all this activity:

  • $2,750 per year = $230 per month = $53 per week.

 

 

Food shopping and eating out

 

Groceries

Weekly supermarket shopping costs around $200, then there’s about another $50 per week spent on additional fresh fruit and veg.

Here are a few general observations, comparing prices in Perth to those in the UK;

  • Beef and lamb is cheaper in Aus than in theUK and other countries.
  • Packaged goods like cereals and biscuits are slightly more expensive.
  • Almost all fruit and veg is grown locally and the price fluctuates greatly depending on the level of supply.

Total food bill for our family of 4:

  • $250 per week.

 

Specials

All supermarkets run weekly and daily specials – the price of individual items can be reduced substantially, sometimes by 30-50%. Therefore, if you are able to allocate enough time to the process, you should be able to reduce your weekly shopping bill significantly – by about 20% – 30% overall.

 

Alcohol

Alcoholic drinks are not usually sold in supermarkets – they are generally sold in “bottle shops”, which may be attached to a pub/hotel or may be a separate shop. Some of the supermarket chains do have bottle-shops as a side-line, located near the main store.

 

Note that every week retailers have specials which can reduce the price by 20% or more. Also, beer is much cheaper if you buy a “carton” of 24 cans/bottles or a “block” of 30 cans, rather than buying 4 or 6 at a time. Often there are savings to be had by buying wine by the case or half case. Wine casks (wine box in the UK), holding 2, 3 or 4 litres are also fairly popular and work out cheaper in general than bottled wine.

  • Emu Draft Beer (aussie mid-strength 3.5%) – 1 block (30 x 375ml) for $24 = $2.14 per litre
  • Full strength aussie beer (5%) – 1 carton (24 x 375ml) normally about $38, on special for $30 = $3.33 per litre
  • Imported premium beers (5%) – 1 carton (24 x 375ml) normally $55, on special for $45 = $5 per litre
  • Wine – red or white 4 Litre wine cask – 2 for $20 = $2.50 per litre
  • Wine – “reasonable” (opinion of author!) bottle of red or white – $10 on special (normally $13)
  • Spirits – 700mL bottles of gin, blended whiskey etc. – $30

Eating / Drinking Out

Here are a few indicative prices seen when eating and drinking out:

  • Cup of coffee = $3.50, mug = $4.00
  • Full cooked breakfast = $19
  • MacDonalds burger/fries/drink meal – $6.95
  • Large pizza (pickup) – $8.95
  • Fillet steak main course with potatoes and a few veg = $30 – $35
  • Glass of wine in restaurant = $8
  • Bottled full-strength beer in pub or restaurant = $6 – $8
  • Pint of Guiness in a pub = $8 – $10

Estimated total for beer/wine, takeaways, eating out for our family of 4:

  • $100 per week.

 

 

Schooling

Here are the education costs for one child in a local private secondary school and one in a state primary.

 

State Primary school

No official fees, but each family at our school is asked to pay $20 “voluntary contribution”, plus $25 to the P&C (Parents and Children association).

 

There’s a stationery order (about $50) at the start of each year, plus the cost of any excursions or incursions (eg. plays put on at the school).

Total for state primary school (approx):

  • $240 per year = $20 per month = $5 per week

 

Private Secondary school

  • Annual Tuition Fees = $4,600 (Year 11)
  • Other costs (approximate) = $800

Examples of “other costs”:

  • Building Levy ($180 per year)
  • Camp fees ($190)
  • netball/athletics/swimming carnivals – $30-$50 each

Total for private secondary school: $5,400 per year = $450 per month = $104 per week.

 

Note: this is a “middle-tier” private school. Fees for the “top” schools can be $12,000 per year for tuition alone. Some private schools, especially Catholic ones, can be quite a bit cheaper.

 

If you go to an Australia migration expo you may be able to find general guidance.

 

Or you can book one of our Australian visa consultations, which gives a face to face full Australian visa assessment.


 

Cars & Travelling

Could be a fortune or a pittance depending on what you feel you need to drive!

 

Check http://www.drive.com.au for prices, and also check:

 

 

Public Transport

As an example, from a typical Perth residential area into Perth CBD (a 2-zone journey), the standard fare would be $3.50 per journey, totalling $35 per week (10 trips). This can be reduced to $26.30 per week by using a “SmartRider” card.

Total weekly costs

 

The weekly “fixed” household spending for a family, rounded up, could be:

 

Mortgage    $450
Other housing costs    $15
Schooling    $100
Cars    $125
Food Shopping    $250
Drink & Eating Out    $100
Sport & Recreation    $55
Total    $1,095

That’s just over $56,000 per year, which requires a gross salary of about $75,000 (one earner) or $36,000 each (two earners) to provide.

You do then of course also have clothes, other shopping, holidays etc. to factor in ?as mentioned, this can only be a guide and depends on lifestyle, number of little darling vampires (aka kids) you have, and so on.

 

 

 

Average Australian Salaries

 

Bear in mind that by definition, as a skilled migrant you are in high demand! If you were not, you would not be eligible for a PR visa!

 

Therefore higher than average salaries can be predicted.

 

Occupation

Average Max

Average Local

Accounting $135,287 $77,924
Admin & Office Support $89,736 $52,825
Automotive $131,429 $64,726
Banking & Financial Services $197,143 $81,729
Community, Sport & Leisure $113,978 $61,846
Construction, Building & Architecture $194,118 $110,122
Customer Service & Call Centre $97,737 $51,013
Education $104,510 $63,600
Engineering $232,679 $112,587
Executive $230,173 $118,416
Government & Defence $140,828 $77,396
Graduate $83,575 $48,051
Hospitality, Travel & Tourism $93,125 $56,757
HR & Recruitment $172,500 $86,354
Insurance $147,778 $68,123
IT & Telecomms $197,029 $99,506
Legal $163,412 $77,228
Logistics, Transport & Supply $142,431 $68,921
Manufactureing $224,633 $83,386
Marketing $150,500 $82,622
Media, Advertising, Entertainment $146,417 $75,034
Medical & Healthcare $156,299 $80,050
Mining, Oil & Gas $222,333 $144,172
PR & Communications $155,000 $84,021
Primary Industry $165,000 $73,560
Property & Real Estate $177,500 $80,256
Retail $183,333 $64,831
Sales $183,125 $87,276
Scientific $142,500 $86,236
Trades & Services $148,438 $64,779
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