Can you live in other states on a subclass 190 visa?

Living in other states on a subclass 190 visa

Can you live in other states on a state-sponsored visa? What is state-sponsorship?

This is one of the biggest issues in skilled migration, because many people mis-understand the reality of the regulations and visa conditions.

The fact is this: The subclass 190 state-sponsored visa is a ‘full Permanent Resident’ visa.

This means that you are given the status of ‘Australian Permanent Residence’.

The visa does not have conditions applied to it that are at all relevant to being state-sponsored. The visa label does not say what state sponsored (just like a PR visa label does not say the occupation used when applying).

The application is the APPLICATION.

Once Permanent Resident status is granted, then you cannot be restricted to live or work in only one state. That would be against the idea of ‘Permanent Residence’ and having full rights in Australia.

Some visas have residential-location specific conditions. The subclass 489 provisional Pr, regional sponsored visa does have the condition that you must live and work in a regional area. What are regional areas of Australia? They are defined by Postcode and generally mean 1 hour drive outside the main cities, but Adelaide is included as a regional area.

But – the subclass 190 state-sponsorship visa does not have any such conditions.

Of course the sponsoring state would like you to live in the state.

But if you ask them directly about this issue – that’s right, ask the state directly about the issue, why not?! – then they will also inform you that it is not a legal condition, legal restriction or otherwise a Federal nor national law related to the entire issue.

The state is also not relevant when applying for citizenship.

The initial issues are one side — but the reality is that you need to apply for the visa to even obtain Permanent Residence

So go to the GET ASSESSED at the top or bottom of these pages and start your personal Australian visa assessment with an expert, now.

You will register into your own Client Area.

From there, you can use the ‘online communication’ area to talk 1-to-1 with your assigned consultant, who will send you your own migration assessment report and explain all the details of your case.

 

Australia suburb guide: Sydney

SYDNEY

 

CARLINGFORD

(25kms north west from Sydney CBD)

Carlingford is a large, multicultural, working-class suburb located in the geographical centre of Sydney.  Sydney has the most expensive property prices in Australia and Carlingford, considering its proximity to major centres like Castle Hill and Parramatta, isn’t as expensive as the majority of the city.  People can live in established houses with land, townhouses or apartments.   Public transport is a train line, bus network and it is very close to several major roads.  Carlingford is mostly working-class families and retirees of mixed nationalities.

Carlingford has one major shopping centre with plenty of parking and a broad range of shops.  Located next door is another shopping centre of predominately Asian grocery stores, shops and restaurants.  There are also many small retail stores in the streets.  There are plenty of park lands and green corridors for outdoor activities and Carlingford is very pet-friendly with many residents having at least one pet.

There are some excellent schools in the area, one of which is James Ruse Agricultural College, which is Australia’s highest ranked school, and very close to The King’s School, the country’s most prestigious boys’ school.

School Name

Gender

Group

Classes

Public/

Private

NAPLAN results

James Ruse Agricultural College

Co-ed

Secondary

Public

Substantially Above

The King’s School

Boys

K-12

Private

Substantially Above

AIS International School

Co-ed

K-12

Public

Not accessed

Carlingford High School

Co-ed

Secondary

Public

Above Average

Carlingford Public School

Co-ed

Primary

Public

Substantially Above

Carlingford West Public School

Co-ed

Primary

Public

Substantially Above

Cumberland High School

Co-ed

Secondary

Public

Below Average

Murray Farm Public School

Co-ed

Primary

Public

Substantially Above

Roselea Public School

Co-ed

Primary

Public

Substantially Above

St Gerard’s Catholic Primary School

Co-ed

Primary

Private

Substantially Above

Overall, many people live in Carlingford because of the relatively affordable housing, the excellent schools, its geographical location and the multiculturalism.  

WAHROONGA

(20kms north west of Sydney CBD)

Wahroonga is one of Sydney’s most beautiful suburbs, known as the ‘garden suburb’.  Located in the North on the Pacific Highway, it contains large homes on big blocks with a notable price tag.  The properties are established with manicured gardens, well-maintained streets, low crime rate and many old trees.  It’s the place where moneyed families, retirees and executives live.  Public transport is good with a train station on a major line and a major highway with regular buses.  There is also one of Sydney’s best private hospitals located here.

There is a small, neat shopping district next to the train station that contains some boutique stores, hair dressers, supermarket and other small retail outlets.  It is also a short drive to Hornsby, which has a very large shopping centre.  Wahroonga has a beautiful park which is popular with locals and the tree-sheltered streets encourage walking.

The schools in the area are all excellent:

School Name

Gender

Group

Classes

Public/

Private

NAPLAN results

Wahroonga Public School

Co-ed

Primary

Public

Substantially Above

Waitara Public School

Co-ed

Primary

Public

Substantially Above

Abbotsleigh

Girls

K-12

Private

Substantially Above

Knox Grammar

Boys

K-12

Private

Substantially Above

Prouille Catholic Primary School

Co-ed

Primary

Private

Above Average

Wahroonga Adventist Primary School

Co-ed

Primary

Private

Substantially Above

St Lucy’s/St Edmund’s School for the Blind

Co-ed

K-12

Private

Not accessed

St Leo’s Catholic College

Co-ed

Secondary

Private

Above Average

If you can afford it, this is the suburb to live in.  It has a safe, village feel and is an excellent place to raise a family.

CLOVELLY

(7kms east of Sydney CBD)

Clovelly is a little coastal suburb in the trendy Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, located between the famous suburbs of Bondi and Coogee, with a culture that is laid-back and welcoming. The properties are small and closely packed, from fully-detached, semi-detached and some apartments.  Property prices are at the higher end but the rent makes the area more accessible.  Public transport is adequate and one bus will get you to the city.  The people who live in Clovelly are beach-types, families, couples and backpackers.  

Outdoor activities are excellent with plenty of coast to explore.  The small Clovelly beach has some gentle surf for swimming, good snorkelling and walking opportunities.  There are four small shopping areas with independently owned food outlets and boutique shops.  There are also lots of cafes and restaurants.

The schools in the area are:

School Name

Gender

Group

Classes

Public/

Private

NAPLAN results

St Anthony’s School

Co-ed

Primary

Private

Above Average

Clovelly Public School

Co-ed

Primary

Public

Above Average

This is the place to live if you like a laid-back beach culture of a coastal town.   

Summary of the subclass 190 state-sponsorship visa

Skilled – Nominated (subclass 190) visa

Features

  • Permanent visa for skilled workers who are nominated by a state or territory government.
  • Allows visa holder to live and work anywhere in Australia.
  • Allows certain family members to be added before the application is decided.

Requirements

  • Nomination by a state/territory government.
  • Invitation to apply.
  • Meet points test pass mark.
  • Nominate a skilled occupation from the relevant skilled occupation list.
  • Hold a suitable skills assessment.
  • Under 50 years of age.
  • At least competent English. (but need at least an IELTS score of min 7 for each part to claim points – which is required)
  • Other standard requirements including health and character.

To be able to lodge a valid 190 visa application you need to first submit an expression of interest (EOI) for this visa and then receive an invitation to apply.

State and territory government agencies will have access to SkillSelect. ASA will coordinate the application with the state Goverment after we submit your EOI

*** If the state/territory government nominates you, you will automatically receive an invitation from SkillSelect to apply for a visa. ***

The Points Test requirement

The points test is a transparent and objective method of selecting skilled migrants with the skills and attributes needed in Australia. The Points Test awards points on the basis of a range of skills and attributes.

You have to meet the Points Test pass mark in order to be granted a visa. The pass mark is the total number of points you must score to pass the Points Test. The pass mark is subject to change and any changes to the pass mark are announced on the department’s website.

In order to submit a complete EOI you must meet the points test pass mark. Your complete EOI will then be ranked on the basis of your claims against points test factors. Invitations will be issued to those who achieve the highest rankings, subject to the operation of the occupational ceiling.

If you receive an invitation to apply and make an application, your application will then be assessed against the Points Test. Your points score against the Points Test must be equal to or greater than the number of points you claimed in your EOI.

What evidence do I need to support my claims?

When you submit your EOI you will not be asked to provide evidence to support your claims. However, if you are invited to apply, you will need to provide evidence to support all the claims that were in your EOI at the time you were invited.

If my circumstances change while waiting for an invitation, what do I do?

EOIs remain active in SkillSelect for two years. During the time from when you submit your EOI to when you receive an invitation or your EOI ceases, information about your attributes and skills may change. SkillSelect will automatically calculate any changes to your age up to the period you are invited. However, for other factors, such as if you upgrade you English proficiency, you will need to enter this new information into SkillSelect.

Age requirements

At time of invitation, you must be less than 50 years of age. This means that even if you are under 50 when you submit your EOI, it is your age at the time an invitation that is taken into account.

Skills assessment

To apply for this visa you must nominate an occupation that is on the SOL that is current at the date an invitation is issued. The SOL lists all eligible occupations for points tested skilled migration.

Regardless of which points tested skilled migration visa you apply for, you must provide evidence that your skills have been assessed as suitable for your nominated occupation by the relevant assessing authority for your nominated occupation.

Each assessing authority has its own assessment procedures, timeframes and fees.

English language requirements

At time of invitation, you will be required to demonstrate that you have at least Competent English. Competent English is defined as an International English Language Test System (IELTS) score of at least six in each of the four components of the IELTS test; or at least B in the Occupational English Test (OET) test; or being a citizen and passport holder of either the UK, Canada, New Zealand, Republic of Ireland or the USA.

Location and eligible visa requirements

You can be in or outside Australia when you submit your EOI, when you lodge an application or when the visa is decided.

If you are intending to apply in Australia, there are no prerequisite visa requirements to lodge an application in Australia. You can apply if you are the holder of any valid visa except some bridging and other non substantive visas (Bridging visas D, E or F; Criminal justice visa; or an enforcement visa).

It is important to note, that an EOI is not a visa application and you will not be granted a Bridging visa. If you are in Australia when you submit an EOI, and you do not hold a valid visa or are unable to apply for one, then you must depart Australia.

Invitation to apply

You can only apply for this visa if you have received an invitation from SkillSelect to apply for the visa.

If you receive an invitation, you will then have 60 days to make a valid visa application, before the invitation expires.

Note:If you do not make a valid visa application after receiving two invitations, your expression of interest (EOI) will be removed from SkillSelect

 

All such details of any subclass of visa, details of the subclass 189 vs subclass 190, which visa is better, as well as living in another state on a subclass 190 visa can change at any time.

For the most up to date and live, personal information on any Australian visa subclass, simply go to the GET ASSESSED options at the top or bottom of the pages now.

 

What is the difference between a subclass 189 and subclass 190 visa?

This is a very common question in the World of Visas & migration!

Just what is the difference between a subclass 189 and subclass 190 visa?

The reality is – very little.

They are in the same General Skilled Migration stream, the application cost is the same or very nearly the same, and the processes and application types are very similar.

The differences in the 189 vs 190 application process are:

Subclass 189 Independent skilled visa:

Stage 1 – skill assessment

Stage 2 – EoI Expression of Interest and DIAC visa application

Subclass 190 State-sponsored skilled visa:

Stage 1 – skill assessment

Stage 2 – State application

Stage 3 – EoI Expression of Interest and DIAC visa application

 

So as you can see, the middle state-sponsorship phase is the real difference.

What does state-sponsorship mean? What is a state-sponsored visa application?

This is NOT sponsorship in the same style as an Employer Sponsored visa.

The state does not offer a job and does not offer hardly anything once you get to Australia on your Permanent Resident visa.

It just means that any state in Australia needs to state that ‘yes, we need this person’s skills in our state’ and approve their state application.

With a state sponsorship application approved, it means that the applicant can then go on and apply for the EoI and DIAC visa application.

The other important aspect of the difference between a 189 and a 190 Australian visa is the skilled list.

The SOL usually refers to the skilled list with occupations that can apply for a 189 PR visa.

The CSOL usually refers to the Consolidated Skilled Occupation List, which means that you can apply for a subclass 190 state sponsored PR visa if your occupation is on that list. It can also refer to eligibility for a subclass 489 visa.

A subclass 489 visa is a provisional Permanent Resident visa which allows the applicant and then visa-holder to live in a regional area of Australia.

The 489 visa is valid for 3 years. In that time, the applicant needs to (1) live in an area of regional Australia for two years, and (2) work in such an area for at least 12 months.

The 489 visa holder is not allowed to live or work in a non-regional (city) area of Australia.

For more general guidance and reading, see the categories tab on the right or the tag cloud on the homepage.

For your own assessment done by a real person, relevant to your situation, simply go to the ‘Get Assessed’ page, either at the top or bottom of the site!